Cross

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This page contains information about a typical Venetian cross.

Contents

Types

Greek cross
Latin cross
Maltese cross
Byzantine cross

Venetian crosses can be categorized into four main types: greek, Latin, Byzantine, and Maltese.

Greek

Greek crosses, or crux immissa quadrata, are the most simple and plain in nature. Typical Greek crosses have arms of equal length that intersect toward the center of the vertical beam. Because of this, Greek crosses tend to appear square in nature.

Latin

Unlike Greek crosses, Latin crosses tend to have ornate decoration. Much of this decoration exists as detailed carvings representing geometric or floral patterns. The arms of Latin crosses also differ from Greek crosses, with the horizontal beam intersecting the vertical beam closer to the top. This Latin style is the most common and recognizable style of cross.

Byzantine

Byzantine crosses are very similar to Latin crosses apart from one main difference: Byzantine crosses contain a second (smaller) horizontal beam above the main one. Byzantine crosses are commonly referred to as Patriarchal crosses.

Maltese

Maltese crosses tend to be the most distinguishable cross style. Unlike Greek and Latin crosses, the arms of Maltese crosses taper as they move inward. In addition the ends of each of the arms are indented, giving the Maltese cross a distinct look. However, like Greek crosses, Maltese crosses have arms of equal length that intersect toward the center giving them a square appearance. Much like confraternity symbols and coats of arms, Maltese crosses were often used to indicate ownership of a building.

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